Press Kit

In this section, members of the press will find the Alliance’s most recent press release and the Alliance’s most recent reports.

Contact: Emanuel Cavallaro
              (o) 202-942-8297 (c) 703-725-0363
              ecavallaro@naeh.org

Homelessness Declines 2 Percent Since 2013, 11 Percent Since 2007
The Department of Housing and Urban Development Releases 2014 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress

Washington, D.C. – According to numbers released today by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, during the January 2014 Point-in-Time Count, communities counted 578,424 people experiencing homelessness. The number of people experiencing homelessness on a given night has declined by 11 percent since 2007. These latest statistics show that communities across the country have increased their focus on getting homeless people quickly back into housing, resulting in a 21 percent decline in chronic homelessness and 33 percent decline in veteran homelessness since 2007.

“It is tremendous news that smart federal investment coupled with innovative local approaches has brought the number of homeless people down,” said Nan Roman, President and CEO of the National Alliance to End Homelessness. “Despite the good news, however, we must do better.” The report points out that nearly one third of people who are homeless are completely unsheltered.  The pace of progress is not fast enough to achieve the widely supported national goals contained in “Opening Doors:  The National Strategic Plan for Preventing and Ending Homelessness.

Required by Congress, HUD’s Point-in-Time Count is an important national assessment of the size of the homeless population. It is the only national survey that counts everyone who is staying in a shelter or other homeless programs as well as people who are living on the streets or other places not meant for human habitation. Its methodology is fairly consistent over time, allowing an assessment of whether the number of homeless people is growing or shrinking.  It does not, however, count every single homeless person, nor does it assess the number of people who are at high risk of homelessness because they have unstable or unacceptable housing.

For insight into the implications of HUD’s new numbers as well as expert commentary on the effectiveness of housing strategies and investments in homeless assistance programs, please contact Alliance Communications Associate Emanuel Cavallaro to arrange an interview with an Alliance spokesperson.

Contact: Emanuel Cavallaro
(o) 202-942-8297
(c) 703-725-0363
ecavallaro@naeh.org

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The National Alliance to End Homelessness is a nonprofit, non-partisan, organization committed to preventing and ending homelessness in the United States. As a leading voice on the issue of homelessness, the Alliance analyzes policy and develops pragmatic, cost-effective policy solutions; works collaboratively with the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to build state and local capacity; and provides data and research to policymakers and elected officials in order to inform policy debates and educate the public and opinion leaders nationwide.

Spotlight

Library Resources

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Other | February 11, 2014
This media resource is meant to provide clarification on five common misconceptions about the Department of Housing and Urban Development's mandated Point-in-Time Counts.
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Report | January 18, 2012
The State of Homelessness in America investigates the changes in homelessness across the country. It presents the Alliance's research on the economic indicators and demographic drivers of homelessness and describes how a variety of factors contribute to increased risk of homelessness among vulnerable populations.
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Report | January 11, 2011
The State of Homelessness in America, the first report of its kind, investigates the changes in homelessness across the country. In addition, the Alliances examines economic indicators and demographic drivers of homelessness, examining how eight factors contribute to increased risk of homelessness among vulnerable populations.